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Voxtar Technique, with *VIDEO GUIDES* by sentimentalgeek!
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socialskills  





Joined: 26 Jun 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:08 am    Post subject: Voxtar Technique, with *VIDEO GUIDES* by sentimentalgeek! Reply with quote

Since I started posting my Voxtar accomplishments, I've gotten a few comments to the effect of "WTF man how u did that?" To answer these elegant and thought-provoking questions, I present a few tricks and tips I've gathered in the course of moving from "horrendous" to "adequate" at playing Guitar and Vocals simultaneously.

Most people who have attempted this kind of multitasking agree that its challenge is met with equal reward, so I've made every (well some, anyway) attempt to imbue this guide with a sense of encouragement in the hope that still others may enjoy this unique way of enjoying Rock Band.

An important note, before we get started. Pmswedge has authored a post compiling many tips useful in furthering oneís aptitude at Vocals, available here. Because this excellent resource exists, I have intentionally omitted many tips pertaining strictly to the art of Vocals alone. In other words, this guide seeks to provide advice towards playing Guitar and Vocals simultaneously, and not necessarily advice towards excelling at either solo instrument.

Voxtar Technique, From Beginner to Advanced

Basic Questions

1. What difficulties should I start at?
Like a lot of good questions that I've decided not to cover in the main body of this guide, the "right" answer here will vary widely based on each individual. That said, my suggestion is this: Take a song that you knew very well before Rock Band came along and play it 5 times at Expert/Expert. If you are still failing by a lot, drop to Hard Vocals and Expert Guitar. Repeat. I advise against dipping any lower than Hard for both Vocals and Guitar, but do so if you must.

SH-James, in his great reply to this thread, makes an excellent case for toughing it out on Expert, right from the beginning (I've highlighted the key statement, one which I heartily endorse):

SH-James wrote:
Only sing on Expert. I cant stress this enough. It will only give you false self confidence to sing on any other level. There is a world of difference between Hard and Expert vocals - a world. If you can't pass a song on Expert solo singing, then practice some more until you can.


As I told SH-James in a PM, his reply was full of thoughtful insight. I wanted to include everything he wrote, but also didn't want to break up the flow of the guide and do the information an injustice by shoehorning everything in. You can read his post for yourself on page 4 of this thread.

Another popular idea is to substitute Bass for Guitar and get comfortable there before moving on to Guitar. Many people in many different forum posts have suggested this, and rabies summarizes their reasoning pretty well:

rabies wrote:
I would recommend beginners try xpert bass+vocals to get a good feel for playing and singing at the same time. Bass is typically much easier than the guitar as it usually keeps a steady beat and has less complicated lines....when you get good, move onto x-guitar.


Though I agree with everything that Rabies has said, Bass+Vocals was more difficult for me. This probably comes down to personal experience, as I have been a guitarist/vocalist in different bands for many years. Ultimately, the best idea is to throw everything at the wall and see what sticks. Use whatever method is most comfortable for you.

2. Should I pass the solo Guitar and Vocals tours first?
It can't hurt! I personally didn't do it this way; literally, the first time I sang a song in Rock Band was while playing Guitar at the same time. I imagine, though, that you'll have to deal less with the "Get used to failing" tip below if you're rock solid at both Vocals and Guitar before trying both simultaneously.

It's also worth noting that two of the best Voxtarists on ScoreHero, violinhero86 and MisterElk, are also high-scoring Vocalists. This is irresistable evidence that working through the Vocals career may better prepare you for Voxtar greatness than any other single factor.

3. Scrolling or Static Vocal Style?
In my opinion, both Vocal Styles have their advantages. In defense of the Static style, MACGYVERRRRRRRRR writes:

MACGYVERRRRRRRRR wrote:
you can just glance at the lyrics once and don't have to be looking up all the time.


This seems to suggest that you're looking at the guitar chart by default, which isn't the way that I do it. I'm probably looking at the vocals 70% of the time and the guitar 30% of the time (see "Stress Vocals, even at the expense of Guitar" section below). Again, I think there are good arguments for and against each style. Use whatever is most comfortable for you.

A. Technique for Beginners
This section seeks to answer some of the most frequently asked questions strictly regarding Voxtar playing. Questions about high scores, gold stars, and full combos are not relevant here (but will be discussed later), because your goals for now are to build confidence, build your skill set, and survive!

1. Stress Vocals, even at the expense of Guitar.
The vast majority of ScoreHero users have long been accustomed to playing the plastic guitar, but Vocals represents a new challenge for many of us. Thus, if we need to shift some of our attention from one thing to another, it makes sense that we shift away from something that we know well (Guitar) and towards something that we donít (Vocals). Here are some other reasons why you should focus on Vocals more than Guitar:

Guitar is harder to fail. A tough solo may result in a Guitar fail every once in a while, but the danger of a Vocal failure looms over every phrase in the song. A "Messy" phrase lowers the audience meter immediately by a dramatic amount, whereas Guitar requires many missed notes and/or overstrums and falls at a trackable pace.

Guitar is easier to memorize on the fly. Finger positions, which are either very simple or slightly harder and grouped largely into familiar categories (2-note chords, 3-note chords, 2-note HO/PO, 3-note HO/PO, etc.), can be absorbed as quickly as seconds in advance and banked into short-term memory, whereas many Vocal phrases force you to watch your pitch on a constant basis.

Once lost, 4x combos are harder to regain for Vocals than Guitar. In most cases a 4x combo is easier and faster to achieve on Guitar than on Vocals. There are some exceptions, or cases in which it takes a while for a Guitar combo to stack up, as in Detroit Rock City and its endless sections of held chords.

Vocal combos are simply worth more points. An "Awesome" Vocal phrase under 4x multiplier with both Vocal and Guitar Overdrive activated is worth 16,000 points. Even compared with the longest Vocal phrases, there are very few circumstances under which a Guitar chart of equal length will score you that many points.

2. Get used to failing.
Think back to your earliest experiences with a guitroller. A good number of us spent a lot of time failing songs at Hard or Expert while first learning, and the same thing is likely to happen to anyone trying to learn how to play the Guitar and Vocals simultaneously. Patience is key, but in the meantime hereís a tip:

You can use your skill at Guitar to offset your Voxtar clumsiness. A common technique is to use Guitar Overdrive exclusively for the purpose of saving yourself after a Vocal fail. Using this technique will guarantee you a spot near the bottom of any relevant leaderboard, but doing this rather than simply cutting your teeth on Practice Mode gives you the opportunity to gain immediate and memorable feedback as to your skill level. Simply put, nobody likes to fail. As you see your skill level increase, you'll find yourself needing to save Vocal fails less and less, and eventually you'll be able to use Overdrive for its intended purpose.

3. Sing in a comfortable range.
I sing almost everything an octave lower than the recording. This is my comfortable range. The main advantages to singing at a comfortable range are:

You can play for longer and with less pain, as you're not straining your vocal chords.

You can keep your eyes on the screen, as singing at the edges of your range often results in things like subconscious eye-closing and moving your jaw up to open your throat and hit higher notes. The latter forces you to stare down your nose to see the screen.

You'll have better control over your intonation, which should result in the arrow moving more nimbly from pitch to pitch. (thanks, Smeddy24!)

There is no limit to how far you can go to ensure that every phrase in a song is within your comfortable range. My adherence to this guideline borders on the insane: there are songs (Wave of Mutilation, I'm So Sick, Highway Star, Don't Fear The Reaper, Say It Ain't So, to name a few) during which I sing in two or three different relative octaves. Iíve literally recharted the songs in my head to fit my comfortable range more appropriately.

*sentimentalgeek has two great videos to help you with these concepts*: the first, available here, uses Time We Had to show how one can jump from octave to octave on a phrase-to-phrase or even within-phrase basis and still achieve the "Awesome" rating. The second video, which is here, demonstrates the technique of holding pitch to hit two notes which are separated by exactly one octave. Five different songs are addressed in this video.

4. Vocal Percussion sections.
First off, no beginner should be ashamed to skip Vocal Percussion sections altogether, as ignoring Vocal Percussion results in no penalties against either your score or the crowd meter. However, the amount of discussion generated by the handling of Vocal Percussion by voxtarists warrants a section dealing with just this topic.

As previously noted in many forum discussions (and demonstrated in the videos of SlyKnuxRealist), Vocal Percussion notes can be collected by "singing" or "speaking" a percussive sound into the microphone. I use a percussive "tuh" sound, but almost any sound should do. The efficacy of this technique will obviously deviate correlative with individual mic sensitivity settings. *For a video example of "tuh," check out sentimentalgeek's Maps voxtar FC!*

If "tuh" doesn't strike your fancy, there are alternate ways to collect vocal percussion, both suggested in replies to this thread:
- You can use the A button on the 360 controller or the X button on the PS3. (thanks, NumberCruncher!)
- If you're using a grounded mic stand of any kind and you're a high sensitivity Vocals player, you can tap your foot on the mic stand. (thanks, nillacocajola!)

Keep in mind that there are no penalties for "overstrumming" Vocal Percussion, so when navigating passages where performing both Vocal Percussion and Guitar are tricky, find the smallest division of the beat and "Tuh" at that rate. For instance, look at the note chart for Maps. Vocal Percussion starts at measure 57, where there are two quarter-notes followed by two eighth-notes. Going "tuh" for 7 eighth-notes nets you all 4 tambourine hits.

Note for intermediate and advanced players: Those who are playing for scores should treat collecting Vocal Percussion notes, and the points associated with them, as essential rather than optional. Bonuses akin to those for Guitar solos are awarded for Vocal Percussion sections, and in the case of songs with long Vocal Percussion sections, these bonuses added to the original point awards can be substantial. As NumberCruncher points out:

NumberCruncher wrote:
For example, GGaHT solo 2, you would only miss like 12 hits if you tapped at straight quarter notes. If you could bump it up to eighth notes, you would get every single hit, netting you 38750 extra points, plus a few more from overdrive.


Here are a few simple songs to test your aptitude at successfully handling Vocal Percussion sections:

(Don't Fear) The Reaper: First off, it's impossible to hear this song without the cowbell present, so you're almost obligated to give the Vocal Percussion a shot. Besides the fact that the cowbell appears over a riff instead of something simpler like a set of chords, this is probably the easiest Vocal Percussion section in the game. It's a nice, steady rhythm that requires minimal practice and minimal thinking. Give it a shot.

Tom Sawyer: After the Vocal chart is done, there are a number of measures during which all youíre playing are an easy Guitar part and an easy tambourine part. Early on, I started to realize that I was concentrating so much on the tambourine part that I was playing the Guitar part strictly from peripheral vision. This gave me a nice confidence boost by telling me that I could take my eyes off of the Guitar chart for extended periods of time without making a stupid mistake.

If you're looking for a challenge, try FC'ing the Vocal Percussion sections in Are You Gonna Be My Girl. Of course, any Vocal Percussion during a solo (Dani California, Green Grass and High Tides) is also incredibly difficult.

Recommended practice songs for beginners.

In Bloom: The first half of each verse is Vocals with no Guitar. The chorus can be tricky at times, but this song is a nice mix of G+V that can lessen some of the intimdation factor.
Maps: One of the easiest Guitar charts. This should teach you to focus on singing while simply playing, as opposed to FC'ing or GS'ing, the Guitar chart.
The Hand That Feeds: A lot like Maps, except that what is an easy guitar solo normally becomes more difficult while needing to sing simultaneously. Also, it'll give you an idea of what different approach you need to take (if any) when "talkie" sections are involved.
Wave of Mutilation: An easy Guitar song with a slightly harder Vocals chart. If you can sing at the same time as FC'ing the fast BO chords just before the second chorus, you're already ahead of the game.
Creep: As suggested by MournTX, this song features very simple Guitar and Vocals chartsÖ until you get to the bridge. I love seeing the look on peoples' faces when they realize that they need to go falsetto and keep up with 24 notes per measure at the same time.

B. Skill Development for Progressing from Intermediate To Advanced
Now that you're comfortable with the basic techniques and common experiences involved in Voxtar playing, let's look at some concepts that are more difficult than the "how" questions that have been answered so far.

1. Strum on auto-pilot.
The following songs make heavy use of a rock staple: eighth-note chord strums underlying the vocal track. During these sections you should only need to glance occasionally at the Guitar chart to absorb the chord fingering, leaving you free to sing while watching for the occasional chord change or minor flourish. (Songs shown in ascending order of difficulty)

Time We Had: The slowest and easiest song of the bunch. This song was my second double FC (after Maps).
Go With the Flow: A bit faster, but the same concept. With some work, this one could easily be another double FC under your belt.
Electric Version: The "grace note" strums between each chord change raises the degree of difficulty. For some people, this is impossible. For others, a little bit of practice is all it takes.

2. Limb independence, Voxtar style.
In learning to the play the drums, one of the most important concepts is limb independence, wherein a player gains the ability to use each of his or her four limbs to tap out, conceivably, four distinctly different rhythms. Playing Voxtar at a high level requires a similar capacity for allowing each action to become completely independent of the other. In each of the following songs, try to FC both the Vocals and Guitar charts during the sections described:

Suffragette City: The verses. The Vocal chart for this song is difficult, and the guitar chart appears to be, but it's not; the verses would be RB chords at a simple, eighth-note clip if not for the RO chords thrown in. All you really have to do is memorize the fact that the chords go from RB to RO, and then listen (rather than look) for the changes. This allows you to keep your eyes on the Vocals chart for the entire verse, each time.
Paranoid: The entire song (except for maybe the solo). As you play it looking for a double FC, it should become apparent that the vocal part of the song seems to "lag" a bit behind the guitar part in rhythm. The timing window for Guitar should take care of most of it, but you'll mysteriously miss a chord every once in a while, and it likely has to do with this lag. This makes the song easy to pass, easy to score, but hard to double FC.
Dani California: Three-note HO/PO groups during each prechorus; "Open strum" chord changes during the chorus.
Reptilia: The chorus ("Yeah the night's not overÖ"). The Guitar chart and Vocal chart are, again, slightly off-rhythm. The difference between this song and Paranoid, though, is that Reptilia forces you to hit a wide variety of notes instead of a repetitive group of chords.

3. Practice.
If you're able to handle all of the songs and passages without any problems at this point, you're now staring at songs like Train Kept a Rollin' and wondering what to do about things like solos during singing. There aren't any tricks for this kind of thing; the only way to get good at these songs are to practice them until you're so familiar with each chart that you can ignore one or the other at difficult moments. Trust me, it doesn't take an overabundance of skill, just some patience and perseverance, and the "a-ha!" moment is pretty well worth it.

C. Scoring for Advanced Players
Stop me if you've heard this one: if you want to rank among the best at your instrument, you need to learn 1) how to path, and 2) how to squeeze. Both of these concepts have long been staples of the ScoreHero community, and both of them have their corrolaries for Voxtarists. Because I am no good at either of these two things, I asked for input from two eminent Voxtarists referenced above.

1. Pathing Tips for Voxtarists, courtesy of MisterElk
The key to creating a good voxtar path revolves around maximizing the amount of vocal phrases you grab under double Overdrive usage. On expert, each phrase can then net you a maximum of 1000 x 4 x 4 = 16000 whopping points, along with a x16 multiplier for the accompanying guitar notes. I'm too lazy to work out the mathematics, but from my experience in making voxtar paths, this method has always produced higher scores than separating OD usage. Don't be tempted to use guitar OD on those guitar heavy parts! Chances are there are shorter vocal phrases elsewhere where your OD will get you more points. Your guitar OD path should be almost the same, if not identical, to your vox OD path.

Most songs actually complement this method nicely! Most of the time, you actually won't find yourself running over too many guitar OD combos and overflowing on guitar OD while you wait for vocal OD; the amount of OD is usually spread between the two rather nicely. However, for example, if you find that you'll be picking up 6 guitar OD combos while you pick up 4 vox OD combos, find a good place to use up the first two globs of OD (and by good place, I mean a place with the shortest vox phrases), and then you'll be left with full OD meters for both instruments, ready to unleash and pick up massive points.

An important thing to remember is that Vocal OD lasts the same amount of time that guitar OD does! Unlike in solo vox, vocal OD waits for no one. Therefore, it's important that when you use vocal OD, you won't be wasting too much of it on spaces in between phrases. Your main targets should be phrases that are short and very close together. Also, knowing how fast Vox OD drains helps with pathing. While you're pathing, see how far any one given activation will last given the amount of OD you start it with; if an activation runs over an OD phrase, simply add about 2 more measures of OD to that activation's lifespan. This will help you find which activations will get you the most vocal phrases under OD. Vocal OD phrases are precious! Only run over them under OD if there are phrases immediately following them to get points for.

2. Squeezing for Voxtarists, courtesy of violinhero86
You know how you can often start a vocals phrase very late and then still get an awesome on it if you sing very accurately? Well, if you're building your paths around the vocals line (which you should since vocals can get a much higher density of points than guitar), and you want to include a particular phrase at the beginning of your activation, don't activate guitar right away and start singing right away. Instead, activate with guitar about halfway through the phrase and don't start singing in the phrase until guitar OD is active. That way the guitar OD will last that much longer and you'll get more vox under x4 OD.

Appendix
These sections are included not not to start arguments, but to give G+V players a more accurate sense of where they are in the development of their skills. Basically, keep it in check when you double FC a "Blistering" song like (Don't Fear) the Reaper and throw yourself a party when you double FC a "Moderate" song like Wanted Dead or Alive.

Songs that are EASIER than their multiplayer tier placement may suggest
Blitzkrieg Bop, Time We Had, When You Were Young, Learn To Fly, Orange Crush, The Hand That Feeds, Go With The Flow, (Donít Fear) The Reaper, Next To You, Cherub Rock, Tom Sawyer, Enter Sandman, Won't Get Fooled Again

Songs that are HARDER than their multiplayer tier placement may suggest
Here It Goes Again, Should I Stay Or Should I Go, Gimme Shelter, Celebrity Skin, Wanted Dead or Alive, Epic, Suffragette City, Ballroom Blitz, Train Kept A Rollin', Brainpower (the triplets during the verse!), Outside, Reptilia, Timmy and the Lords of the Underworld

Acknowledgements
Thanks to MournTX, Smeddy24, dore, NumberCruncher, Siberian, i5hawn, rabies, MACGYVERRRRRRRRR, violinhero86, and MisterElk for their valuable suggestions and contributions. Thanks to jrod321 and b08smith for their encouragement. Thanks to Morkai and skeltonath for introducing the immensely useful term "voxtar" to ScoreHero. Thanks to Cluckles' for sharing a picture of the clothes hanger mic stand workaround.

Changelog
10-29-08 - Added nillacocajola's tip for Vocal Percussion; tried to emphasize sentimentalgeek's videos a bit more, though I don't think I quite got it.
07-10-08 - Added two more sentimentalgeek videos under A3.
04-22-08 - Added Section C; minor grammatical changes; revised to use "voxtar" term; emphasized the benefit of becoming a top-flight Vocalist in order to later become a top-flight voxtarist
04-07-08 - Added Section B; minor grammatical changes
03-05-08 - Posted Section A
_________________
Accomplishments
- Over 110 million solo RB1 points!
- 2,029 of 2,030 possible solo RB1 stars!
- All 3,255 RB1 BWT stars collected (solo, voxtar, expert)

Voxtar guide.


Last edited by socialskills on Thu Oct 30, 2008 1:08 am; edited 13 times in total
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MACGYVERRRRRRRRR  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suggestion: play with static vocals while doing this so you can just glance at the lyrics once and don't have to be looking up all the time. Unless you're a hummer, then BOOOOOOOOOOOO.
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MournTX  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Creep is a great practice song as well, and so is Interstate Love Song from a DLC perspective.

Great guide, I love this aspect of the game.
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socialskills  





Joined: 26 Jun 2007
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MACGYVERRRRRRRRR wrote:
Suggestion: play with static vocals while doing this so you can just glance at the lyrics once and don't have to be looking up all the time.

i dunno, personally i think you should be looking up most of the time. regardless, it's a good tip for some, so i'll add it in a future update, thanks!

MournTX wrote:
Creep is a great practice song as well, and so is Interstate Love Song from a DLC perspective.

yeah, creep is a good one... it's even got a little bit of trial-by-fire to it when you get to do falsetto+super fast chords simultaneously. interstate love song is also good for practice with three-note chords; i had already planned to add these both in future updates, so we're on the same page here. thanks!
_________________
Accomplishments
- Over 110 million solo RB1 points!
- 2,029 of 2,030 possible solo RB1 stars!
- All 3,255 RB1 BWT stars collected (solo, voxtar, expert)

Voxtar guide.
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krisdaschwab912  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My Sharona is the best practice song. Any no-talent loser *looks in a mirror* can sing that song. The guitar is harder. The song is great.

Also, I agree with the "get used to failing" part, except I can't get used to it. Just can't do it.
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cdylan13  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ive passed Blackened and Ride the Lightning but I can't pass Sweet Leaf or Calling Dr. Love lol!
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BobaFrets  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 1:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lots of good advice, there.

The one thing that would make sing/strum easier would be the ability to move the vocal track to the bottom of the screen! That way it would be simpler to focus on the pitch while watching the notes. I wonder if we'll ever see that option someday.
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Cluckles  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 5:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://img213.imageshack.us/img213/732/0303082243wg2.jpg

There is my mic stand solution. It's a bent up clothes hanger hanging from a light in my room, sits at perfect mouth height and I can adjust the angle by bending the back part.


Love the guide too, really liking some of the responses (Interstate Love Song, how cool it'd be to put the vocals part at the bottom). Keep it up!
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good stuff here, keep it coming
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b08smith  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great guide

Hopefully will get more people trying this out. If a multi-instrument section in Tech, Style and Gameplay is ever created this should be the first sticky!
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bmwhiskerZ  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 6:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great guide.
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BenniWells wrote:
Gold Stars that aren't FCs are like prostitutes, sure they look good at the time, but later on it kills you know that you could have done a lot better.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=-60t7xliTkU
http://youtube.com/zacklesauce
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boredathome  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

is it bad that i dont play guitar and sing, i drum and sing. the g+v combo is too easy to me, i still dont play both on x yet, just guitar, v i do on hard (for now) but the drums and me seem to be doing good on our career. anyways. am i the only crazy one??
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X drums, X guitar & bass
Vocals...yah right. only H
beingmused about the strat wrote:
beingmused wrote:
Everyone should be happy with them, except those that demand a clicky strum bar (which I've never understood. When watching videos, it always makes me cringe when people have clicky strumbars...it sounds like someone is playing Hungry Hungry Hippos nearby).
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BobaFrets  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Drums and vocals is more challenging, to be sure. When I play guitar, I often sing along even when I'm not the vocalist. however, when I play drums, it's hard for me to even sing along, let alone stay on the pitch bar. It just requires too much concentration for me.
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socialskills  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BobaFrets wrote:
Drums and vocals is more challenging, to be sure.

qft.

boredathome wrote:
is it bad that i dont play guitar and sing, i drum and sing. the g+v combo is too easy to me, i still dont play both on x yet, just guitar, v i do on hard (for now) but the drums and me seem to be doing good on our career. anyways. am i the only crazy one??

i get the feeling that you're in the minority if g+v is easy to you at this point, hence why i thought something like this guide might be useful. however, are you at hard for vocals rather than expert because expert is too hard for you at this point?

thanks to everyone above for the comments and ideas so far! pretty much everything that people have added will be absorbed into the guide in future updates, appropriately credited of course.
_________________
Accomplishments
- Over 110 million solo RB1 points!
- 2,029 of 2,030 possible solo RB1 stars!
- All 3,255 RB1 BWT stars collected (solo, voxtar, expert)

Voxtar guide.
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boredathome  





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PostPosted: Thu Mar 06, 2008 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just want to beat my vox career on X b4 i try to sing and play
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X drums, X guitar & bass
Vocals...yah right. only H
beingmused about the strat wrote:
beingmused wrote:
Everyone should be happy with them, except those that demand a clicky strum bar (which I've never understood. When watching videos, it always makes me cringe when people have clicky strumbars...it sounds like someone is playing Hungry Hungry Hippos nearby).
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